Blogs

connectivity

 

 

 

There are many perils in modern life – living and working being two of the most obvious. Trying to do both without the internet is increasingly difficult.

 

I am sat in my favourite café – the Ramos Generales in Ushuaia. Sited in an old shop/warehouse it is lined with beautiful (if dusty) shelves full of objects from an earlier age and has the best bread by far in town in addition to good beer and steak. What more does a man need, apart from the internet? Nothing, today, anyway.

 

being away

Who would be a whaler? Not many, thesedays. A rough life, even if you disregard the mechanics and morality. Consider though, for a moment ,the men who came down to the South Atlantic to work in the industry here on South Georgia. I’ve met a few of them – a few survive in the Falklands.

Heading to the Falklands

We are about to sail - not the royal we, you understand, but the ship I am currently on - G Expedition. Big red thing. Great stuff - heading to the Falklands. I love the islands, all seven hundred of them! Yes, 700 - you read it right. Amazing eh? And, no, I had no idea till I first went there some 20 years ago now. An age away. 

Happy New Year from Ushuaia

It is 31/12/2015. Im in Ushuaia. 

From the open window of my hotel room the sun is glaring on my computer screen. It is 7pm and the sounds and smells of mid summer pour in. In the garden opposite, yellow and orange horned poppies whip in the ever present Patagonian breeze, for even in mid summer there is a wind in Ushuaia, flowing down from the snowy peaks of the Southern Alps behind the busy town. 

Nothing like a little bit of history

A couple of days ago it came to my attention that some of our winterers do not know who Edward Wilson was. I’m still working out what I think of that.

And how to remedy the situation.

Antarctic Food

It might not have passed your attention that I am a chef - rather a chef in Antarctica than an Antarctic chef, because not much of what I do is unique to here. Past Antarctic chefs - from Clissold (with Scott 1911-12), Green (with Shackleton 1914-16) and Cutland who was a chef on the Antarctic Peninsula in the late 1950's, really were Antarctic chefs in the true sense of the word in that, to a large extent they cooked and served meat that was shot and butchered locally. I, on the other hand do not, and indeed could not due to the provisions of the Antarctic Treaty.

sun up in Antarctica

Sorry, it has been a while since my last post - we've had a busy old time here at Halley and some quite remarkable weather of late.

Mid-Winter in Antarctica

We are - thankfully - just past our shortest day here at Halley and we have been enjoying a week off to make the most of our temporary isolation. Well, I say temporary, but we still have just over four months before we will hear and see the BAS planes coming across the ice sheet - so as usual this is a relative timeframe.

sun down and mid winter presents and radio 2

The sun left us last week - dropping beneath the northern horizon mid afternoon for the last time for around 100 days. We marked the day by climbing up to the top of the base and lowering the old Union flag - this was done by our oldest base member Nick Warburton. Come early August, our youngest base member, Silver, will raise the new flag to celebrate the sun's return. Just a week since we lost the sun, our days are already very short - with little or no light other than a glimmer on the horizon.

Aurora and Diamond Dust

Since my last blog, I have been out and about on my winter trip, and we have had amazing weather conditions - our coldest, most beautiful period with amazing sun haloes and dogs during the day and wild aurora at night. Blessed are we to be here. I'll get onto the weather in a bit after I tell you about my winter trip.

Syndicate content